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1 (877) 353-3771

Family Caregiver Support Program

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Family Caregiver Support Programi s a program founded in every state and is developed and funded in part by the Administration on Community Living and administered in Maine by the DHHS Office of Aging and Disability Services and sponsored locally by the Area Agencies on Aging.  This program provides support services to unpaid families or friends caring for an older adult (age 60 or older) or a person with dementia, and to older adults (age 55 or older) who are raising relative children (age 18 or younger). The Program provides the following:

  • Caregiver Specialists:provide information and assistance, individual counseling, individual and group support, caregiver training, assistance with getting respite, and other services. Information and assistance is available on a variety of topics to help you in your caregiving role, including respite, support groups, legal and financial services, disease-specific information, self-care tips and more.
  • Information: Family Caregiver Specialists offer a broad range of information and resources to help caregivers gain access to support services including respite, support groups, legal and financial services, disease-specific information, self-care tips and more.
  • Assistance:Family Caregiver Specialists offer an opportunity for individual one-to-one contact to assess the problems and capacities of caregivers and to link caregivers to opportunities and services available.
  • Individual Counseling, Support Groups and Trainingpresent the opportunity to talk about the financial, physical and emotional challenges, with professionals and peers in similar situations, so you are able to make better care-related decisions and better cope with problems or unique situations that may arise. 

Family Caregiver Specialists can help a caregiver cope with the responsibilities of caregiving, and reduce stress by:

  • Learning how to balance caregiving time with personal, family and work life
  • Avoiding feeling resentful, trapped, helpless or “burned out” and increasing personal satisfaction
  • Getting help managing the financial impact of caregiving
  • Learning how to take care of him or herself as a caregiver
  • Making it easier to talk with family and friends about care needs
  • Making sure a loved one has the care and assistance he or she needs
  • Finding convenient, expert help and support

For more information, contact the ADRC at 1-877-353-3771.